Shaun Rosier, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor

Bachelor of Architecture Studies in Landscape Architecture (Victoria University of Wellington)

Post-graduate Diploma in Landscape Architecture (Victoria University of Wellington)

PhD in Landscape Architecture (Victoria University of Wellington)

Bachelor of Architecture Studies in Landscape Architecture (Victoria University of Wellington)

Post-graduate Diploma in Landscape Architecture (Victoria University of Wellington)

PhD in Landscape Architecture (Victoria University of Wellington)

Dr. Shaun Rosier is an Assistant Professor in Landscape Architecture at Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA. He completed a Ph.D. in Landscape Architecture through Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand in 2021, and holds further graduate and undergraduate degrees in Landscape Architecture. His Ph.D. was undertook through a practice-led modality where designing was both the means and object of the research. This was the first practice-led Ph.D. in Landscape Architecture to be completed in New Zealand.

His doctoral and ongoing research focuses on the aesthetic notion of the sublime, particularly how it can be operationalised, or put to work, as a concrete and designable experience in landscape. Central to this is a close apprenticeship to Deleuzian philosophy with an emphasis on an aesthetics of affect and assemblage. This allows stronger means to
understand what design techniques ‘do’, what agency they provide a designer in relation to a given problem. This highlighting of design technique brings forth the complex relationships between representation, fieldwork, design alterations, and the ‘problem at hand’, where each relies on and feeds off each other. Such attention to design technique is significant for a discipline that has at times struggled to affirm the particular power of landscape
designing.

Shaun has a strong interest in the remediation of large scale post-industrial landscapes, particularly quarries and mines. He has begun to develop design techniques and methodologies where landscape architectural design can be integrated into the processes of extraction so that remediation unfolds throughout the quarries lifetime instead of a final milestone. He also places an emphasis on urbanistically related projects that grapple with development, social, political, and ecological paradigms.

Research Areas:
• Practice-led/based research
• Design technique
• Landscape Aesthetics
• Affect and Assemblage thinking in landscape design technique
• Landscape representation
• Fieldwork techniques
• Quarry/Mine remediation
• Aesthetic material in digital design methods