17 September 2021
9:00AM – 5:00PM — 213 Draper Road NW.

Today is Park(ing) Day so we’re out in the street instead of in Cowgill Hall

Park(ing) Day

Today is the 15th Anniversary of Park(ing) Day

Take a break from your work or your walk, bring your lunch or coffee and join landscape architecture students as they repurpose a parking space.
213 Draper Road NW. See you there!

This creative transformation of parking spaces into parklets and inventive alternatives to an automobile-dominated environment helps communities see the incredible potential of streetscapes, which can comprise up to 80 percent of public space in cities.

This year also marks the 15th anniversary of Park(ing) Day! Rebar, a collective of landscape architects, planners, and designers, created the first Park(ing) Day installation in 2005, and the first annual Park(ing) Day event in 2006.

Park(ing) Day was first conceived of as a user-generated, open-source event created by and for many people. The event has led to a global movement that has enabled communities re-imagine their streets, increase social connections, and improve health and well-being. In many communities, Park(ing) Day has led to new permanent parklets, plazas, and an expanded public realm.

The innovative models created through Park(ing) Day also laid the groundwork for the re-design of streetscapes in the wake of COVID-19. Communities have responded to the need for social distancing and concerns about the safety of indoor environments by taking back streets. Temporary parklets, patios, and street plazas have proliferated. Curbside space has been repurposed for dining, commerce, or green space. Vehicles have been banned, and streets turned over to pedestrians and cyclists. Now the goal is to make many of these improvements permanent!

According to landscape architect John Bela, ASLA, co-creator of Park(ing) Day, “many communities are grappling with what happens next with ‘temporary’ outdoor spaces. Landscape architects have a special role to play in shaping the future of these spaces and balancing the use of our streets and public right of way.”